Tuesday, April 28, 2009

AMERICAN AIRLINES STEWARDESS Emergency Training in 1957-1959


From American Airlines 707 Jet Stewardess Argie Hoskins

Above is my Daddy who taught me to keep things in order to accomplish a task. Tasks were done with strict discipline. Obedience to the task was demanded and expected. As a public school teacher, I found that students who had not learned to internalize discipline could not focus and accomplish a goal.
I am quoting a cowboy friend who worked for Daddy from time to time, "Al would tell me what he wanted to get done. He would than tell me what he was going to do, told me what I was going to do and said, "Now be careful!" As a windmiller for a large ranch, Al took his job very seriously. It could be a dangerous venture, getting up the windmill tower to repair whatever was needed. Thank you Daddy for being an example of hard and dedicated work ethics. Mother used to say, "You are just like your Daddy," for me that was a compliment. American Airlines set that expectation for the Stewardess Corp.



From American Airlines 707 Jet Stewardess Argie Hoskins

Above is my Mother for whom I am grateful for her intuitive soul, hard work and good judgment. She taught me to think outside the box. "Sister, if you can not do it one way, you can do it another." "Think before you act." "Think of others before yourself." "Do your best!" Thank you dear Mother for being you and helping me be me. Neither of us was perfect, but we hung in there and kept trying until something worked. Life is hard work! It is worth it!

Honestly, I had the foundation for learning and applying the skills needed for Emergency Training.

I am amazed at the metamorphic process from caterpillar to butterfly. What does this have to do with me and Emergency Training? The caterpillar was evolving step by step. As I ponder my training as a stewardess and the "me" who emerged from that training during the years of my flying experience, it was all good. For successfully handling of any emergency, it was important to know what to do on an automatic level so I could depend on my knowledge and skill. Wow! I needed to learn sooo much. And good ole American Airlines picked me, Argie Hoskins, because they knew that I could do it! Now to get rid of the self doubts and have confident inside of me. The task ahead was to learn what I needed to know on an automatic level, no guess work! Along the way something really great happened, I found in me, a new me, not only did I know the procedures, but I had good judgment. You can't learn everything you need to know by the book. There is no substitute for good judgment. Always have in my mind plan "A" and plan "B" for this is survival. Later as a school teacher, we had workshops on "thinking outside the box." I realized that I had been thinking outside the box for year and years.

My first Emergency Training was focused on DC-6, DC-6B, DC-6 Coach, DC-7, DC-7 Coach, DC-7 Dual Service, and the Convair. The Emergency Equipment: EXITS and how to open the window exits from inside and in some cases the outside of the aircraft. ROPES were located in exit windows and doors of certain aircraft. EVACUATION SLIDES were stored on the cabin doors. The Lounge exit had a slide. It was fun to practice our skills while overcoming fear. FIRE EXTINGUISHERS were located in various locations on the several aircraft. OXYGEN cylinder, outlets, walk-around bottles were strategically placed. FLASHLIGHTS were on some aircraft. EMERGENCY LIGHTS replaced flashlights on all aircraft. Another item that we always checked when we boarded was the SERVICE KIT which contained First Aid Equipment. We were trained to remember to take the SERVICE KIT with us if we evacuated. We didn't have the theme bandaides that children plaster all over them these days. That would have been an interesting demand. We had a FIRE AXE located on the forward side of cockpit door on all aircraft. FIRE DETECTORS AND EXTINGUISHING EQUIPMENT and FLOTATION SEAT CUSHIONS were on some aircraft.

This is a statement from my American Airlines Manual: "The successful handling of any emergency aboard an aircraft depends to a large degree on you and your knowledge. There is never an emergency in which there isn't something you can do to help. Safe procedures require a cool head. The ability to think straight and operate calmly requires knowledge of what to do. There is no substitute for good judgment. The outline that follows assigns specific Stewardess responsibilities on the DC-6/DC-7 and the Convair. If, on the DC-6/DC-7 an emergency occurs and the specific location of the First Stewardess at the time makes it difficult or time consuming to accomplish her duties as outlined, then good judgment should dictate that she carry out the Second Stewardess' duties and vice -versa. The Second Stewardess under such conditions should take her cue from the First Stewardess.

Now the task for me was to know what responsibilities were First Stewardess and Second Stewardess because I felt that I could do both at the same time. That has been my challenge all my life; I think that I can do it all. I can't! I must be in charge of my stewardship and others must be committed to their stewardship. In case of an emergency, I must know what I can do and do it! Don't expect someone else or the government to solve the problems that I must handle.

More later!
And oh yes, Have a Happy Heart!

And this is the more later! This morning I thought of a couple more things that came to mind. I know that when I have time to write from my journal; I will have more to say. For now as I remember, the kind of emergency situations that I was trained for back in the 1950's were varied. BELLY LANDING when the gear would not come down was not very different than a normal landing. However there was the possibility of the shock of the hard landing of the tail and even more hard the landing of the nose. What was comforting was that we would be near the ground for easy departure. I remember the advice was to inform the passengers to relieve their bladders so that on impact the bladder would not burst. I never found that in the manual, but thought it was a good idea. Along with that idea was the use of the pillows and position of the body on impact. NOSE WHEEL UP MAIN GEAR DOWN will position the aircraft in a nose down, tail up! This position business of landing was hard for me because of the sequencing challenge in my brain. Up, down, down up! Concepts had to be over learned!
* KNOW YOUR PROCEDURES
* USE GOOD JUDGMENT
* KEEP COOL

One evening the crew was dead heading a plane back to LA. An engine caught on fire! We made an emergency landing. I was not one bit concerned. The flying crew knew what to do!

The following was not an emergency, however it could have been. After having had an extended layover in New York because of a wicked snow storm, the cold, continuing gray skies, and weather conditions, we loaded our passengers in the hangar as we continued to de-ice. Little did we know that inspite of the working snow plows the runway conditions were still icy. The noises on take off didn't seem that much different from other icy, snowy takeoffs. When we deplaned in LA, the crew was talking and taking notes as they studied the rolled up metal on the belly of the plane. I suppose this rolled up metal on the fuselage was caused by ice on the runway. I have always wanted to see that report.

One evening flying between El Paso and Douglas, the pilot lower the plane very quickly. He reported that he had picked up an unidentified object in our path. He was not asleep at the wheel. Speaking of such! I flew with a flight engineer that shared that he believed in UFOs because of the things that he had observered while flying. Interesting!

A near miss! On take off from New York and again during the winter, we almost did not make it over a fence at the end of the runway and into the water we could have gone. BUT the crew did some very quick and skilled flying to leap us over the fence. I loved flying with those old World War II pilots. They were so great! From the props to the jets, they were the greatest!!!!! I was afraid to fly before I became a stewardess. Just knowing the skill of the men at the wheel was a comfort. I am now married to an old pilot from World War II. When we are fly we hear every sound and movement of the aircraft. We have traveled on many airlines. And you know my choice of carriers.

In my opinion, American Airline is the best for their concern and training for Emergency Training. I would do it all over again for American.

More later!
Have a Happy Heart!

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

M. Hoskins-Shumway:
Amazing! After 50 years, still so much the same. During any emergency, our core foundation is:
1. Correct action w/o hesitation
2. Knowledge of duties/procedures
3. Teamwork and communication
And the fourth step, which is oh so very important, you guessed it, good judgment! However today, we say, "sound judgment." Our Flight Attendants are encouraged (expected) to utilize "sound judgment" during any crisis. When I speak with them after an emergency incident, I tell them that I can only provide you with a baseline on how to react. You must know this baseline without so much as even a second thought. From there, quickly build your strategy while using “sound judgment.” This will ultimately ensure your own personal safety, fellow crew "stewardesses" safety and the safety of your passengers. May I honor you someday by reposting a few of your comments in one of my future company Flight Attendant "Stewardesses" news letters? I look forward to additional postings surrounding similar topics. Respectfully, FMP

argie hoskins shumway said...

FMP, Here I am! I just cleaned up my Emergency Training blog. I remember one thing and that one thing jump starts my brain in recalling other events. Yes, if I have anything of value that you would like to share, please feel free to do so and yes, it would be an honor. Thank you!

I am also working the history of my children. Dear,tender memories of their precious steps with Argie their mother has been tear jerking.

Recently we took a trip to southwestern New Mexico. I had a blast digging up old memories and more old memories. So much to write. I write fast leaving out letters, words, and connections, however history is so much fun. Of course, I am aware of the legal "stuff" and I try to be careful. I could write a lot more if, that "stuff" were not on my mind. I don't want to get anyone in trouble. Later, Argie Hoskins

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rozydesouza said...

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Allen said...

Oh great its very good training. Its very beneficial for emigrate passenger.

Danny said...

Thanks for sharing your personal view on the parenting helps for helping , bringing up and guidance indeed this is very important for the children person for giving the solid foundation for of career.
thanks

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Robert Lee Schout said...

Thank you for the work you have done in making this wonderful view into your life. I have been a customer of american for so many years that I have a zero in front of my AA advantage number. In the 1970s, we built malls all over the country. Woodfield in Schaumberg was one. Then, in 1980, in order to keep a vow my wife and I made in the early 1970s, I left corporate life and moved from Bloomfield Hills to the woods of west michigan. By this time we had adopted 6 children, all but two of the hard to place or special needs variety. Eventually, we adopted a total of 14, and managed to get 8 of the kids through college. We now have of course 27 grandchildren, all of them good looking. We never accepted any state money or professional help from any agency we worked with. I made all the money necessary- working as a consultant, on commerical projects, and as a finance specialist. Through all the years we lived in west michigan, I have continued to fly an average of 250,000 miles per year. Most on american. In fact, american made it possible to get anywhere in the world on time to meet with clients. Without this great airline, and its wonderful people, including crandal,and his wife, whom I met several times on AA flights, and of course the great pilots of american who seemed to know how to fly better than anyone, The Mrs and I would not have been able to finance much less keep our vow to adopt as many children as we could get our hands on. It all worked out. I do remember the 707 jets and seemed to live on them, always in first class, and also loved the DC10, although it had issues. Thank you for organizing this wonderful walk through memory land.

argie hoskins shumway said...

Thank you for the beautiful life of sharing with so many children. Your family is to be remembered as an example of the principle of compassion and charity. I am grateful for your generous comments and dedication of our choice of carriers. Yes, American Airlines!

argie hoskins shumway said...

Thank you.

argie hoskins shumway said...

We are on a journey to do our best. Blessings to you.

argie hoskins shumway said...

Thanks!

argie hoskins shumway said...

Dear FMP,
AnonymousMay 1, 2009 at 7:48 PM

M. Hoskins-Shumway:
Amazing! After 50 years, still so much the same. During any emergency, our core foundation is:
1. Correct action w/o hesitation
2. Knowledge of duties/procedures
3. Teamwork and communication
And the fourth step, which is oh so very important, you guessed it, good judgment! However today, we say, "sound judgment." Our Flight Attendants are encouraged (expected) to utilize "sound judgment" during any crisis. When I speak with them after an emergency incident, I tell them that I can only provide you with a baseline on how to react. You must know this baseline without so much as even a second thought. From there, quickly build your strategy while using “sound judgment.” This will ultimately ensure your own personal safety, fellow crew "stewardesses" safety and the safety of your passengers. May I honor you someday by reposting a few of your comments in one of my future company Flight Attendant "Stewardesses" news letters? I look forward to additional postings surrounding similar topics. Respectfully, FMP
ReplyDelete
argie hoskins shumwayMay 3, 2009 at 9:31 AM

FMP, Here I am! I just cleaned up my Emergency Training blog. I remember one thing and that one thing jump starts my brain in recalling other events. Yes, if I have anything of value that you would like to share, please feel free to do so and yes, it would be an honor. Thank you!

I am also working the history of my children. Dear,tender memories of their precious steps with Argie their mother has been tear jerking.

Recently we took a trip to southwestern New Mexico. I had a blast digging up old memories and more old memories. So much to write. I write fast leaving out letters, words, and connections, however history is so much fun. Of course, I am aware of the legal "stuff" and I try to be careful. I could write a lot more if, that "stuff" were not on my mind. I don't want to get anyone in trouble. Later, Argie Hoskins
ReplyDelete

IS THERE SOME WAY TO CONTACT YOU! I DESIRE TO VISIT WITH YOU ABOUT MY BOOK: MORE THAN A TICKET FROM PROPS TO JETS YOU ARE GOING TO FIND IT DELiGHTFUL AND I NEED TO ASK YOU A QUESTION OR TWO. PLEASE ANSWER ME AT argie.ella@gmail.com